Why an FBI Special Agent’s Aug. 19, 1947 Memo to J. Edgar Hoover is so important to ‘The Maury Island Incident’

AgentWilcoxMemo1

Today (Aug. 19, 2014), is the 67th anniversary of FBI Special Agent Jack B. Wilcox’s 14-page memorandum to J. Edgar Hoover on the subject of “FLYING DISCS SIGHTED BY FRED CRISMAN and HAROLD A. DAHL, TACOMA, WASHINGTON,” as well as the release of film distributor IndieFlix’s “first original series: The Maury Island Incident”! The link between the 1947 Wilcox memo to Hoover, and the film’s release on this date, is wholly intentional. As filmmakers, we’re happy to share how inspired we were by the detail and thoroughness of this heavily-redacted memo; its candor, and upon multiple readings, its absolute accuracy in reporting the truth of what really happened off Maury Island in 1947. This overlooked, declassified document truly informed the spine of our film and series.

If you loved The X-Files; if you miss The Twilight Zone’s mix of strange tales and human frailties; if you are simply enthralled about periods of history where the entire country – or planet, even – falls under the spell of a powerful mythology and pop culture brew, then the story of what allegedly happened at Maury Island, and the indisputably twisted and true story of what happened after Maury Island, is for you.

Each week during the next month, we’ll release other once-classified documents obtained from the FBI that track their two week investigation that begins with the tragic August 1, 1947, crash of a B-25 bomber in the forests north of Kelso, Washington, and concludes with a series of clear statements that undermine the only thing you think you know about Harold Dahl’s June 21, 1947, “flying discs” sighting at Maury Island:

That the sighting itself was a “confessed hoax.”

Indeed, our investigation leads to some startling conclusions:

  1. The supposed “confessions” were the real hoax
  2. The FBI knew the confessions were invented, and 
  3. That Harold Dahl had made a choice to invent the hoax story even though he knew he’d become “the biggest liar that ever lived” because he feared ongoing public ridicule about his sighting, family pressure, and threats from – you guessed it – the FBI and modern UFO history’s first alleged “Man In Black.”

And if this is true, and you’ve always dismissed Maury Island as a confessed hoax, then everything you think you know about the Maury Island Incident is wrong!

Sixty-seven years ago today, Special Agent Wilcox wrote the memo that explained it all – download a PDF of it by clicking here.

We hope you come back during the next month to track the investigation with us. And please, enjoy the IndieFlix series by clicking here.

– Steve Edmiston
Writer/Producer

– Scott Schaefer
Director/Producer